Gold Fever in Dahlonega, Georgia

Visit the site of America’s first gold rush just 90 minutes from Atlanta

About an hour and a half north of Atlanta, just past the strip malls and new housing developments in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains is the lively town of Dahlonega, Ga.  Dahlonega is the site of the country’s first gold rush and there is still gold in them there hills, although it’s more of the tourist variety now than the shiny yellow metal.

1.  Take a Tour

Dahlonega was the site of the first gold rush in the United States. Gold has a deep history here and you can learn all about it on a Gold Tour. The Dahlonega Gold Museum is an excellent place to start and gives an overview of the gold rush and the different types of mining in the area (placer, hydraulic, and hard rock), as well as information about the history of Dahlonega. There are two available mine tours, Consolidated and Crisson. Crisson has old equipment displayed (plus a genuine moonshine still). Consolidated offers an underground mine tour that does a great job telling how gold was hard rock mined and what it was like to be a miner. Both mines offer gold panning and gem mining.

2. Explore Downtown Dahlonega

Downtown Dahlonega is has a quaint, walkable square with interesting shops and restaurants. On Saturday afternoons from 2 -5pm in late April – early Oct., locals gather with their banjos and violins at the Gold Museum for the Appalachian Jam.

The General Store is a great place to find everything from panning equipment to toys to homemade jam and Connie’s is the perfect place to stop for ice cream.

3. Hike to Waterfalls

Dahlonega is also a haven for outdoor enthusiasts. The start of the Appalachian trail is right outside of town and there are eight waterfalls within Lumpkin County and the surrounding areas. If you’re only hitting a few of the waterfalls, go with the big ones like Amicalola Falls State Park and Anna Ruby Falls. We tried to find Dick’s Creek Falls and has some difficulty, plus although pretty, it wasn’t as spectacular as the other two.

4. Go to a Festival

There are lots of things to do in Dahlonega on any given day, but during certain times of the year, the town hosts some well known, award winning festivals like Gold Rush Days, in October. This festival was voted a top 20 event in the southeast by the Southeast Tourism Society. The Mountain Top Rodeo in June includes rodeo fun plus a Midway with games (including a mechanical bull) and fair food.

5.  Rent a Cabin and Enjoy the View

There are a variety of accommodations in Dahlonega, but we stayed in a Vacation by Owner cabin called Carson’s Run. The four-bedroom home with its wide deck, fire pit and hot tub invited us to spend an evening under the stars grilling out and enjoying each other’s company. The surrounding woods provided privacy from other vacationers and ample sticks for roasting marshmallows. It was a nice end to a busy day of mining.

Although we were provided a complimentary room and admissions for the purpose of reviewing (as is common in the travel industry), we only recommend places we would stay and products we would use.

January 3rd, 2011 | by Sue Rodman 3 comments

3 Responses to “Gold Fever in Dahlonega, Georgia”

1. Sonja on January 3rd, 2011

Hi Jamie, Jane, Kayt, Rebecca and Sascha,
Just wanted to let you know I gave your blog a mention in my blog post today: http://www.toeuropewithkids.com/2011/01/who-needs-travel-book.html.
Sonja

2. Sue on January 4th, 2011

Hi Sonja, Thanks for linking. If you’re ever in the Atlanta/SE, check out http://www.fieldtripswithsue.com. I write about things to do in Atlanta and easy getaways from the city (and Hartsfield Airport).

3. Home Exchange Mom on January 7th, 2011

Love the Appalachian Jam sessions, it’s so rare to find music out in the open anymore. To think in little towns like this it used to be a daily occurrence. Reminded me of another little town in Connecticut outside of Hartford, can’t remember the name, but they still have this little (30x30ft) ice skating rink right in the middle of downtown and all the kids would be there in the afternoons.


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